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Calculus Reordered

A History of the Big Ideas - 700 - 14814020

Buch von David M. Bressoud

90775479
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Details
Artikel-Nr.:
90775479
Im Sortiment seit:
30.07.2019
Erscheinungsdatum:
16.08.2019
Medium:
Buch
Einband:
Gebunden
Autor:
Bressoud, David M.
Verlag:
Princeton Univers. Press
Sprache:
Englisch
Rubrik:
Mathematik
Analysis
Seiten:
224
Abbildungen:
74 b&w illus./ 1 table
Gewicht:
573 gr
Beschreibung
Calculus Reordered takes readers on a remarkable journey through hundreds of years to tell the story of how calculus grew to what we know today. David Bressoud explains why calculus is credited to Isaac Newton and Gottfried Leibniz in the seventeenth century, and how its current structure is based on developments that arose in the nineteenth century. Bressoud argues that a pedagogy informed by the historical development of calculus presents a sounder way for students to learn this fascinating area of mathematics. Delving into calculus's birth in the Hellenistic Eastern Mediterranean--especially Syracuse in Sicily and Alexandria in Egypt--as well as India and the Islamic Middle East, Bressoud considers how calculus developed in response to essential questions emerging from engineering and astronomy. He looks at how Newton and Leibniz built their work on a flurry of activity that occurred throughout Europe, and how Italian philosophers such as Galileo Galilei played a particularly important role. In describing calculus's evolution, Bressoud reveals problems with the standard ordering of its curriculum: limits, differentiation, integration, and series. He contends instead that the historical order--which follows first integration as accumulation, then differentiation as ratios of change, series as sequences of partial sums, and finally limits as they arise from the algebra of inequalities--makes more sense in the classroom environment.
Information zum Autor
David M. Bressoud is DeWitt Wallace Professor of Mathematics at Macalester College and Director of the Conference Board of the Mathematical Sciences. His many books include Second Year Calculus and A Radical Approach to Lebesgue's Theory of Integration. He lives in St. Paul, Minnesota.
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